How much is homeowners insurance?

While the national average for home insurance is $2,601 a year, home insurance rates will vary by a number of factors. The coverage levels you choose, as well as the location of your home, can push your rates up or down. Other factors, like the size, age, and construction type of your home will impact rates, as will features like a pool, hot tub or sauna.

Average home insurance cost by state

The cost of homeowners insurance will vary depending on the state you call home. Insurers will consider all of the risks in your area when setting a premium, including everything from severe weather to crime rates and local laws, which can lead to dramatically different averages between states.

Our analysts found that Oklahoma is the most expensive state for homeowners insurance, coming in at an average of $5,858 a year. Oklahoma is prone to severe weather including tornadoes, hailstorms and windstorms, which can do severe damage to homes. Severe weather risks will always push up the cost of insurance. 

On the other end of the spectrum is Hawaii, where the average homeowners policy runs $613 a year. While Hawaii is also prone to severe weather, including hurricanes, most standard homeowner policies in the Aloha State exclude coverage for hurricane damage. Removing that risk drops the cost of coverage dramatically. 

“One major factor in Hawaii is the fact that most standard homeowner insurance policies do not cover hurricane damage. Hurricane Iniki, which hit in 1992, did so much damage that the majority of insurers excluded hurricane damage from their coverage. Homeowners in Hawaii now have to purchase a separate hurricane damage policy,” says Michael Barry, chief communications officer at the Insurance Information Institute (Triple-I), an insurance industry research and education organization.

Take a look at the average home insurance rate in your state and how it compares below.

State Average annual premium Average monthly premium Hurricane deductible
Alaska$1,708$142None
Alabama$3,147$2622%
Arkansas$3,958$330None
Arizona$2,490$208None
California$1,405$117None
Colorado$4,099$342None
Connecticut$2,231$1862%
Washington, D.C.$1,342$1122%
Delaware$1,384$1152%
Florida$4,419$3682%
Georgia$2,302$1922%
Hawaii$613$51None
Iowa$2,654$221None
Idaho$1,961$163None
Illinois$3,062$255None
Indiana$2,991$249None
Kansas$4,843$404None
Kentucky$3,326$277None
Louisiana$3,594$2992%
Massachusetts$1,640$1372%
Maryland$1,715$1432%
Maine$1,391$1162%
Michigan$2,411$201None
Minnesota$2,420$202None
Missouri$3,543$295None
Mississippi$3,380$2822%
Montana$3,289$274None
North Carolina$2,941$2452%
North Dakota$3,147$262None
Nebraska$4,800$400None
New Hampshire$1,221$1022%
New Jersey$1,526$1272%
New Mexico$2,647$221None
Nevada$1,467$122None
New York$1,816$1512%
Ohio$2,160$180None
Oklahoma$5,858$488None
Oregon$1,755$146None
Pennsylvania$1,911$1592%
Rhode Island$1,950$1622%
South Carolina$2,678$2232%
South Dakota$3,390$283None
Tennessee$3,060$255None
Texas$3,851$3212%
Utah$1,802$150None
Virginia$2,151$1792%
Vermont$1,263$105None
Washington$1,612$134None
Wisconsin$1,662$138None
West Virginia$1,911$159None
Wyoming$1,897$158None

Average home insurance cost by state and dwelling coverages

Check the map below to see the average cost of home insurance in each state.

Map
Table
AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DC DE FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY
StateAverage annual rates for $200,000 in dwelling coverageAverage annual rates for $300,000 in dwelling coverageAverage annual rates for $400,000 in dwelling coverageAverage annual rates for $600,000 in dwelling coverageAverage annual rates for $1,000,000 in dwelling coverage
Alabama$2,391$3,147$3,798$5,144$7,056
Alaska$1,355$1,708$2,064$2,779$4,098
Arizona$1,906$2,490$3,063$4,086$5,161
Arkansas$3,328$3,958$4,675$6,099$7,768
California$1,043$1,405$1,772$2,598$4,266
Colorado$3,169$4,099$4,662$5,542$7,384
Connecticut$1,750$2,231$2,707$3,641$4,762
Delaware$1,078$1,384$1,729$2,474$3,406
Florida*$3,773$4,419$4,984$5,854$6,574
Georgia$1,760$2,302$2,881$4,006$5,743
Hawaii$461$613$791$1,154$1,831
Idaho$1,476$1,961$2,449$3,427$5,288
Illinois$2,423$3,062$3,587$4,390$5,752
Indiana$2,313$2,991$3,620$4,451$5,749
Iowa$2,022$2,654$3,230$4,388$6,267
Kansas$3,638$4,843$5,688$6,798$8,310
Kentucky$2,486$3,326$4,153$5,182$6,452
Louisiana$2,822$3,594$4,409$5,277$5,979
Maine$1,021$1,391$1,741$2,510$3,972
Maryland$1,318$1,715$2,131$3,028$4,700
Massachusetts$1,303$1,640$1,998$2,746$4,168
Michigan$1,825$2,411$2,956$3,564$4,680
Minnesota$1,828$2,420$2,999$4,308$5,991
Mississippi$2,646$3,380$3,941$4,700$6,039
Missouri$2,638$3,543$4,114$4,956$6,641
Montana$2,523$3,289$3,831$4,271$5,825
Nebraska$3,809$4,800$5,904$7,365$8,451
Nevada$1,093$1,467$1,853$2,707$4,135
New Hampshire$948$1,221$1,488$2,032$3,064
New Jersey$1,171$1,526$1,894$2,619$3,915
New Mexico$1,829$2,647$3,489$4,529$5,908
New York$1,340$1,816$2,349$3,276$4,904
North Carolina$2,141$2,941$3,398$4,375$6,031
North Dakota$2,431$3,147$3,898$4,682$6,991
Ohio$1,805$2,160$2,613$3,265$4,301
Oklahoma$4,442$5,858$7,012$8,426$8,865
Oregon$1,347$1,755$2,185$3,016$4,108
Pennsylvania$1,475$1,911$2,130$2,902$3,908
Rhode Island$1,505$1,950$2,381$3,327$5,235
South Carolina$2,061$2,678$3,219$4,319$5,765
South Dakota$2,607$3,390$3,970$5,353$7,420
Tennessee$2,369$3,060$3,737$4,873$6,573
Texas$2,951$3,851$4,643$5,602$6,799
Utah$1,416$1,802$2,161$2,876$4,201
Vermont$974$1,263$1,555$2,147$3,269
Virginia$1,645$2,151$2,694$3,430$4,314
Washington$1,260$1,612$2,017$2,801$4,314
Washington, D.C.$984$1,342$1,703$2,384$3,699
West Virginia$1,465$1,911$2,354$3,271$5,041
Wisconsin$1,274$1,662$2,038$2,711$4,091
Wyoming$1,351$1,897$2,490$3,703$5,597

*Some state rates will vary based on the addition of a hurricane deductible and may be much higher when included.

Get homeowners insurance rates in your ZIP code

What you will pay for home insurance depends on many factors, but you can get a loose estimate by comparing rates in your ZIP code. Using our home insurance calculator below, you can compare average home insurance rates by ZIP code at 10 different coverage levels.

Home insurance calculator

Average home insurance rates in Texas
$200,000
$200,000 $300,000 $400,000 $600,000 $1,000,000
$100,000
$100,000 $300,000
Standard ($1000)
Standard ($1000) Hurricane (2% of insured value)

Most & least expensive ZIP codes for homeowners insurance in Texas

Most expensive

ZIP codeCityHighest rate
77550Galveston$10,164
77586El Lago$9,906
77551Galveston$9,536
77554Galveston$9,358

Least expensive

ZIP codeCityLowest rate
78559Iglesia Antigua$1,956
78593Santa Rosa$1,999
79915El Paso$2,008
79905El Paso$2,009
Data updated in 2024
Read our full methodology

Average home insurance cost by ZIP code

Insurance.com’s analysis found the highest homeowners insurance rates in ZIP code 27936, which is Frisco, North Carolina. Homeowner premiums in this ZIP code averaged a shocking $9,915 a year. 

ZIP codes in Nags Head, North Carolina, and Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina, rank second and third, respectively.

The cheapest ZIP code is in Honolulu, Hawaii, followed by Aiea, Hawaii.

You can also look at how much home insurance costs in your state on average to see how your ZIP code compares.

The most expensive ZIP codes for home insurance

Here are the top 10 most expensive ZIP codes in the U.S. for home insurance and the cities where they're located.

ZIP codeStateCityAverage annual premiumHurricane deductible
27936North CarolinaFrisco$9,9152%
27959North CarolinaNags Head$9,4272%
27948North CarolinaKill Devil Hills$9,3042%
27949North CarolinaDuck$9,0482%
28445North CarolinaHolly Ridge$8,737None
28443North CarolinaHampstead$8,651None
27915North CarolinaAvon$8,615None
27943North CarolinaHatteras$8,559None
28460North CarolinaNorth Topsail Beach$8,434None
28403North CarolinaWilmington$7,970None
28570North CarolinaBogue$7,929None
77545TexasFresno$7,3012%
28465North CarolinaCaswell Beach$7,2992%
77461TexasNeedville$6,7762%
27981North CarolinaWanchese$6,7162%
77471TexasRosenberg$6,7102%
77417TexasBeasley$6,6852%
27954North CarolinaManteo$6,5542%
77459TexasMissouri City$6,5532%
77469TexasRichmond$6,4252%

The least expensive ZIP codes for home insurance

These are the top 10 least expensive ZIP codes for home insurance in the U.S. and the cities where they're located.

ZIP codeStateCityAverage annual premiumHurricane deductible
96813HawaiiHonolulu$610None
96701HawaiiAiea$613None
96703HawaiiAnahola$614None
95051CaliforniaSanta Clara$990None
94087CaliforniaSunnyvale$991None
94086CaliforniaSunnyvale$992None
95054CaliforniaSanta Clara$995None
94085CaliforniaSunnyvale$997None
95053CaliforniaSanta Clara$998None
95050CaliforniaSanta Clara$1,000None
94043CaliforniaMountain View$1,003None
19808DelawarePike Creek$1,0062%
95014CaliforniaCupertino$1,015None
94040CaliforniaMountain View$1,018None
94041CaliforniaMountain View$1,019None
95401CaliforniaSanta Rosa$1,020None
95008CaliforniaCampbell$1,022None
94024CaliforniaLos Altos$1,024None
94022CaliforniaLos Altos$1,026None
19804DelawareNewport$1,0682%

Average home insurance cost by company

Insurers consider various risk factors and use proprietary algorithms when setting a rate that can result in dramatically different premium quotes from company to company. 

While many of the factors insurers evaluate are the same — such as the square footage of your home and the age of your roof — each carrier weighs these factors differently, which leads to differences in premium quotes. This makes shopping around for coverage a pivotal part of the buying process — doing so enables you to find an insurer that offers the best rates for your profile. 

According to our data, Allstate has the lowest average annual premium at $2,098 annually, or $175 a month. Auto-Owners came in second with an average annual premium of $2,160, and State Farm rounded out the top three at $2,169.

Travelers is the most expensive insurer in our rankings with an average annual premium of $3,701, 76% more than Allstate. These numbers clearly show that shopping your coverage on a regular basis is the best way to make sure you are getting the cheapest rates.

Check the chart below to see the rates for major insurers. 

CompanyAvg annual premiumAvg monthly premium
State Farm$2,169$181
Farmers$3,194$266
Allstate$2,098$175
USAA$2,506$209
Nationwide$2,746$229
American Family$2,504$209
Travelers$3,701$308
Auto-Owners$2,160$180
Progressive$3,193$266

Average home insurance cost by coverage level

The amount of coverage you carry will impact how much you pay for homeowners coverage, as will the deductible you choose. The higher your deductible, the lower your premium.

Below are the nationwide average annual rates for homeowners insurance at several coverage levels, including homeowners insurance for a $200,000 house and home insurance for a $400,000 house, all with a $1,000 deductible.

Dwelling coverageLiabilityAverage annual premium
$200,000$100,000$1,988
$200,000$300,000$2,005
$300,000$100,000$2,582
$300,000$300,000$2,601
$400,000$100,000$3,211
$400,000$300,000$3,231
$600,000$100,000$4,651
$600,000$300,000$4,677
$1,000,000$100,000$7,380
$1,000,000$300,000$7,412

How much is home insurance a month?

The average cost of home insurance per month is $217, based on our standard dwelling coverage of $300,000. How much you actually pay will depend on your profile and how much coverage you get. 

Below are the average monthly premiums for various coverage levels. 

Dwelling coverageLiabilityAverage monthly premium
$200,000$100,000$166
$200,000$300,000$167
$300,000$100,000$215
$300,000$300,000$217
$400,000$100,000$268
$400,000$300,000$269
$600,000$100,000$388
$600,000$300,000$390
$1,000,000$100,000$615
$1,000,000$300,000$618

How are homeowners insurance rates calculated?

Insurers consider a variety of factors when setting a premium. Here are some of the biggest factors influencing the cost of homeowners insurance:

  • Your home’s location: Insurers will look at the specific risk factors in that area, including weather, crime and claim rates as well as other factors. 
  • Your home’s value: Bear in mind that the value used by insurance companies isn’t the same as your home’s market value. Insurers look at the cost of rebuilding the home, not its resale value.
  • Cost to rebuild: Insurers may have to pay to rebuild your home if it is destroyed. Higher rebuilding costs will lead to a higher premium.
  • Construction costs: Local construction costs, including labor, building materials availability, price and building regulations all affect rates.
  • Your home’s age: Older homes may have more risks, such as outdated wiring, plumbing and mechanicals. 
  • Risk exposure: Risk exposure on your property, for instance, from a swimming pool, trampoline, guest house or aggressive breed of dog can lead to higher rates.
  • Fire protection: Your neighborhood’s fire protection rating, which looks at how close your home is to a fire station, is also a factor.
  • Claim history: Your personal and neighborhood claim history, as well as the previous homeowner’s claim history will all be considered, claims tend to raise rates.
  • Insurance score: Your insurance score is based, in part, on your credit history. Only three states don’t allow this – Massachusetts, Hawaii, and California; Maryland doesn’t use credit for home rates but does for auto rates.

For more information on how home insurance rates are determined, review some of the main factors affecting your home insurance rate. You can also use the home insurance calculator below to see what average rates are in your neighborhood.

Methodology

Insurance.com compared homeowners insurance rates in 2023 provided by Quadrant Data Solutions for dwelling coverage ranging from $200,000 to $1,000,000 with liability limits of $100,000 and $300,000 and a deductible of $1,000 for all available ZIP codes. ZIP codes were ranked based on the average rates for dwelling coverage of $300,000, liability coverage of $300,000, and a $1,000 deductible and included all credit ratings. Content was updated in 2024.

Home insurance FAQs

Why did my home insurance go up?

Home insurance rates go up for a lot of reasons. Numerous claims in your area and an increased risk of severe weather or wildfires can push up the cost of coverage. Local factors such as increases in building costs or updated building codes can result in a higher premium. Your personal risk factors can also increase your rates. For example, if you file a claim or put in a pool or trampoline, your rates are likely to increase. If you don’t know why your rates went up, call your insurance company for an explanation.

Why is my home insurance so high?

There are a lot of factors that go into home insurance rates. If you've filed numerous claims, have poor credit, or there are high-risk factors in or around your home, your rates will be higher. The location of your home also makes a big difference.

“Homeowner rates are based on actual and anticipated losses across the state, so if a state is prone to natural disasters, it will push up the cost of insurance for everyone in the state,” the Triple-I’s Barry says. “It will have the biggest impact on areas where natural disasters tend to hit most often, coastal areas, for example.”

How much should home insurance go up each year?

There's no set amount for home insurance increases, as many factors are involved. In many states, wildfires and natural disasters related to climate change are pushing up rates more dramatically than in the past. Regardless of whether your risk factors have changed you can expect an annual increase as the cost of rebuilding your home increases over time.