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The average home insurance rate nationwide is $2,777 a year, or $231 a month. The cost of home insurance by state varies, however, and is affected by things like extreme weather and the cost of building materials.

Oklahoma has the highest home insurance rates in the country at $5,317 a year. Hawaii, on the other end of the spectrum, is the cheapest state for home insurance at only $582 a year.

Below we’ll look at average home insurance rates by state and explain why some states are more expensive than others.

Average homeowners insurance cost by state

The cost of home insurance by state varies a lot because so many factors go into rate calculations. Homeowners in states that are prone to hurricanes, hail storms and tornadoes tend have the highest home insurance rates, an Insurance.com analysis of 2022 rates from top insurers for nearly every ZIP code in the country.

Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, Arkansas, Texas and South Dakota are the most expensive states for home insurance. Among the least expensive states for home insurance are Hawaii and California.

As you’ll see in the homeowners insurance cost by state chart below, Oklahoma is the most expensive state for home insurance with a rate $2,540 higher than the national average. While these rates are based on 2022 rates for a coverage level of $300,000 for dwelling and liability coverage and a $1,000 deductible, we'll compare other coverage levels further down the page.

Map
Table
AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DC DE FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY
StateAverage annual rates for $200,000 in dwelling coverageAverage annual rates for $300,000 in dwelling coverageAverage annual rates for $400,000 in dwelling coverageAverage annual rates for $500,000 in dwelling coverage
Alabama$2,614$3,489$4,123$4,581
Alaska$1,674$2,131$2,525$2,937
Arizona$1,701$2,224$2,747$3,061
Arkansas$3,655$4,201$4,598$5,026
California$1,027$1,380$1,741$2,138
Colorado$2,964$3,661$4,142$4,162
Connecticut$1,826$2,378$2,940$3,307
Delaware$1,210$1,559$1,944$2,350
Florida*$1,786$2,426$3,005$3,530
Georgia$2,297$3,024$3,800$4,526
Hawaii$440$582$749$918
Idaho$1,841$2,453$3,062$3,684
Illinois$2,321$2,752$3,210$3,701
Indiana$2,410$3,097$3,631$3,957
Iowa$2,310$3,017$3,482$4,118
Kansas$4,094$4,939$5,427$5,996
Kentucky$3,082$3,701$4,049$4,203
Louisiana$2,317$2,905$3,494$3,696
Maine$1,310$1,756$2,134$2,387
Maryland$1,289$1,694$2,117$2,546
Massachusetts$1,278$1,603$1,952$2,315
Michigan$2,131$2,607$2,950$2,975
Minnesota$2,309$2,930$3,718$4,475
Mississippi$3,042$3,841$4,578$5,040
Missouri$2,765$3,498$4,189$4,783
Montana$2,446$2,717$3,023$3,488
Nebraska$3,800$4,893$5,433$5,892
Nevada$1,483$1,794$2,159$2,500
New Hampshire$1,152$1,551$1,950$2,342
New Jersey$1,174$1,555$1,965$2,276
New Mexico$2,030$2,926$3,624$4,071
New York$1,608$2,058$2,586$2,997
North Carolina$2,112$3,031$3,524$3,936
North Dakota$2,361$3,139$3,883$4,105
Ohio$1,835$2,267$2,760$3,171
Oklahoma$4,193$5,317$6,387$7,192
Oregon$1,695$2,198$2,662$3,072
Pennsylvania$1,720$2,198$2,670$3,039
Rhode Island$1,415$1,878$2,339$2,829
South Carolina$2,335$3,042$3,637$4,059
South Dakota$2,980$3,844$4,596$5,079
Tennessee$2,455$3,107$3,712$4,122
Texas$3,525$4,142$4,529$4,979
Utah$1,382$1,755$2,112$2,473
Vermont$1,214$1,540$1,818$1,962
Virginia$1,903$2,249$2,423$2,787
Washington$1,313$1,659$2,054$2,448
District of Columbia$1,114$1,520$1,921$2,318
West Virginia$1,982$2,539$2,996$3,511
Wisconsin$1,549$2,027$2,478$2,822
Wyoming$1,751$2,436$3,176$3,883

Which state has the highest homeowners insurance rates?

Oklahoma has the highest average cost of homeowners insurance at $5,317. Below you'll see the top five most expensive states for homeowners insurance.

States with the highest home insurance rates
RankStateAverage rates
1Oklahoma$5,317
2Kansas$4,939
3Nebraska$4,893
4Arkansas$4,201
5Texas$4,142

Which state has the lowest homeowners insurance rates?

Hawaii is the least expensive state for homeowners insurance, with an average rate of $582. Below are the top five least expensive states for homeowners insurance.

States with the lowest home insurance rates
RankStateAverage rate
1Hawaii$582
2California$1,380
3Washington D.C.$1,520
4Vermont$1,540
5New Hampshire$1,551

Why is home insurance so cheap in some states? It's important to note that the coverage included in each state's standard policy affects rates. Exclusions or separate deductibles for wind storms are common, and have a big impact on the average rate. Most home insurance policies in Hawaii exclude hurricanes, resulting in lower average rates.

Compare homeowners insurance rates by ZIP code

Not every part of the state has the same average rates; your ZIP code makes a difference. Our home insurance calculator lets you get a home insurance estimate for your ZIP code at various coverage levels. You'll see the average rate, as well as the highest and lowest, fielded from major carriers.

Comparing homeowners insurance rates is the quickest path to cheaper rates. Choosing a higher deductible, making sure you get all the discounts that you can and not filing too many claims can also ensure you get the cheapest home insurance.

HOME INSURANCE CALCULATOR

Average home insurance rates in CALIFORNIA

$200,000
$1,000
$100,000
94404 - Foster City
Dwelling $200,000, Deductible $1,000 and Liability $100,000.

AVERAGE RATE: $797

HIGHEST RATE: $1,179 LOWEST RATE: $496

Most & least expensive zip codes for homeowners insurance in California

Most Expensive

Zip CodeCityHighest Rate
92325Crestline$1,450
92391Twin Peaks$1,426
92321Cedar Glen$1,425
92352Lake Arrowhead$1,423

Least Expensive

Zip CodeCityLowest Rate
94086Sunnyvale$742
94085Sunnyvale$743
94087Sunnyvale$743
95051Santa Clara$743

Average homeowners insurance rates by state by coverage level

The cost of homeowners insurance varies not just based on where you live, but on the coverage you choose. In the sections below we look at several different coverage levels. The dwelling coverage is the replacement coverage for the house itself and has the biggest impact on rates.

All of these rates have a $1,000 deductible and $300,000 in liability.

$200,000 in dwelling coverage by state

Homeowners in Oklahoma pay the highest insurance rates for $200,000 dwelling coverage. In comparison, the cost of home insurance is the lowest in Hawaii, at $440 a year for the same coverage limits.

Average home insurance rates for $200,000 in dwelling coverage
StateAverage Rate$ more or less than national avg $2,233% difference from national avg $2,233
Oklahoma$4,193$1,96088%
Kansas$4,094$1,86183%
Nebraska$3,800$1,56770%
Arkansas$3,655$1,42264%
Texas$3,525$1,29258%
Kentucky$3,082$84938%
Mississippi$3,042$80936%
South Dakota$2,980$74733%
Colorado$2,964$73133%
Missouri$2,765$53224%
Alabama$2,614$38117%
Tennessee$2,455$22210%
Montana$2,446$21310%
Indiana$2,410$1778%
North Dakota$2,361$1286%
South Carolina$2,335$1025%
Illinois$2,321$884%
Louisiana$2,317$844%
Iowa$2,310$773%
Minnesota$2,309$763%
Georgia$2,297$643%
Michigan$2,131-$102-5%
North Carolina$2,112-$121-5%
New Mexico$2,030-$203-9%
West Virginia$1,982-$251-11%
Virginia$1,903-$330-15%
Idaho$1,841-$392-18%
Ohio$1,835-$398-18%
Connecticut$1,826-$407-18%
Wyoming$1,751-$482-22%
Florida$1,738-$495-22%
Pennsylvania$1,720-$513-23%
Arizona$1,701-$532-24%
Oregon$1,695-$538-24%
Alaska$1,674-$559-25%
New York$1,608-$625-28%
Wisconsin$1,549-$684-31%
Nevada$1,483-$750-34%
Rhode Island$1,415-$818-37%
Utah$1,382-$851-38%
Washington$1,313-$920-41%
Maine$1,310-$923-41%
Maryland$1,289-$944-42%
Massachusetts$1,278-$955-43%
Vermont$1,214-$1,019-46%
Delaware$1,210-$1,023-46%
New Jersey$1,174-$1,059-47%
New Hampshire$1,152-$1,081-48%
Washington D.C.$1,114-$1,119-50%
California$1,027-$1,206-54%
Hawaii$440-$1,793-80%

Homeowners insurance on a $300k home

For homeowners insurance with $300,000 in dwelling coverage, Oklahoma has the highest rate at $5,317 and Hawaii has the lowest rate at $582 based on a 2022 analysis by Insurance.com.

Take a look at the full list below.

Average home insurance rates for $300,000 in dwelling coverage
StateAverage Rate$ more or less than national avg $2,777% difference from national avg $2,777
Oklahoma$5,317$2,54091%
Kansas$4,939$2,16278%
Nebraska$4,893$2,11676%
Arkansas$4,201$1,42451%
Texas$4,142$1,36549%
South Dakota$3,844$1,06738%
Mississippi$3,841$1,06438%
Kentucky$3,701$92433%
Colorado$3,661$88432%
Missouri$3,498$72126%
Alabama$3,489$71226%
North Dakota$3,139$36213%
Tennessee$3,107$33012%
Indiana$3,097$32012%
South Carolina$3,042$26510%
North Carolina$3,031$2549%
Georgia$3,024$2479%
Iowa$3,017$2409%
Minnesota$2,930$1536%
New Mexico$2,926$1495%
Louisiana$2,905$1285%
Illinois$2,752-$25-1%
Montana$2,717-$60-2%
Michigan$2,607-$170-6%
West Virginia$2,539-$238-9%
Idaho$2,453-$324-12%
Wyoming$2,436-$341-12%
Connecticut$2,378-$399-14%
Florida$2,364-$413-15%
Ohio$2,267-$510-18%
Virginia$2,249-$528-19%
Arizona$2,224-$553-20%
Oregon$2,198-$579-21%
Pennsylvania$2,198-$579-21%
Alaska$2,131-$646-23%
New York$2,058-$719-26%
Wisconsin$2,027-$750-27%
Rhode Island$1,878-$899-32%
Nevada$1,794-$983-35%
Maine$1,756-$1,021-37%
Utah$1,755-$1,022-37%
Maryland$1,694-$1,083-39%
Washington$1,659-$1,118-40%
Massachusetts$1,603-$1,174-42%
Delaware$1,559-$1,218-44%
New Jersey$1,555-$1,222-44%
New Hampshire$1,551-$1,226-44%
Vermont$1,540-$1,237-45%
Washington D.C.$1,520-$1,257-45%
California$1,380-$1,397-50%
Hawaii$582-$2,195-79%

Note that the dollar differences in parenthesis are those that are greater than the national average.

$400,000 in dwelling coverage by state

At $400,000 in coverage the highest annual average rate is $6,387 in Oklahoma and the lowest annual average rate is $749 in Hawaii.

Average home insurance rates for $400,000 in dwelling coverage
StateAverage Rate$ more or less than national avg $3,231% difference from national avg $3,231
Oklahoma$6,387$3,15698%
Nebraska$5,433$2,20268%
Kansas$5,427$2,19668%
Arkansas$4,598$1,36742%
South Dakota$4,596$1,36542%
Mississippi$4,578$1,34742%
Texas$4,529$1,29840%
Missouri$4,189$95830%
Colorado$4,142$91128%
Alabama$4,123$89228%
Kentucky$4,049$81825%
North Dakota$3,883$65220%
Georgia$3,800$56918%
Minnesota$3,718$48715%
Tennessee$3,712$48115%
South Carolina$3,637$40613%
Indiana$3,631$40012%
New Mexico$3,624$39312%
North Carolina$3,524$2939%
Louisiana$3,494$2638%
Iowa$3,482$2518%
Illinois$3,210-$21-1%
Wyoming$3,176-$55-2%
Idaho$3,062-$169-5%
Montana$3,023-$208-6%
West Virginia$2,996-$235-7%
Florida$2,983-$248-8%
Michigan$2,950-$281-9%
Connecticut$2,940-$291-9%
Ohio$2,760-$471-15%
Arizona$2,747-$484-15%
Pennsylvania$2,670-$561-17%
Oregon$2,662-$569-18%
New York$2,586-$645-20%
Alaska$2,525-$706-22%
Wisconsin$2,478-$753-23%
Virginia$2,423-$808-25%
Rhode Island$2,339-$892-28%
Nevada$2,159-$1,072-33%
Maine$2,134-$1,097-34%
Maryland$2,117-$1,114-34%
Utah$2,112-$1,119-35%
Washington$2,054-$1,177-36%
New Jersey$1,965-$1,266-39%
Massachusetts$1,952-$1,279-40%
New Hampshire$1,950-$1,281-40%
Delaware$1,944-$1,287-40%
Washington D.C.$1,921-$1,310-41%
Vermont$1,818-$1,413-44%
California$1,741-$1,490-46%
Hawaii$749-$2,482-77%

$500,000 in dwelling coverage by state

Below are the average annual home insurance rates for the dwelling coverage of $500,000 and $1,000 deductible.

Average home insurance rates for $500,000 in dwelling coverage
StateAverage Rate$ more or less than national avg $3,594% difference from national avg $3,594
Oklahoma$7,192$3,598100%
Kansas$5,996$2,40267%
Nebraska$5,892$2,29864%
South Dakota$5,079$1,48541%
Mississippi$5,040$1,44640%
Arkansas$5,026$1,43240%
Texas$4,979$1,38539%
Missouri$4,783$1,18933%
Alabama$4,581$98727%
Georgia$4,526$93226%
Minnesota$4,475$88125%
Kentucky$4,203$60917%
Colorado$4,162$56816%
Tennessee$4,122$52815%
Iowa$4,118$52415%
North Dakota$4,105$51114%
New Mexico$4,071$47713%
South Carolina$4,059$46513%
Louisiana$3,969$37510%
Indiana$3,957$36310%
North Carolina$3,936$34210%
Wyoming$3,883$2898%
Illinois$3,701$1073%
Idaho$3,684$903%
West Virginia$3,511-$83-2%
Florida$3,506-$88-2%
Montana$3,488-$106-3%
Connecticut$3,307-$287-8%
Ohio$3,171-$423-12%
Oregon$3,072-$522-15%
Arizona$3,061-$533-15%
Pennsylvania$3,039-$555-15%
New York$2,997-$597-17%
Michigan$2,975-$619-17%
Alaska$2,937-$657-18%
Rhode Island$2,829-$765-21%
Wisconsin$2,822-$772-21%
Virginia$2,787-$807-22%
Maryland$2,546-$1,048-29%
Nevada$2,500-$1,094-30%
Utah$2,473-$1,121-31%
Washington$2,448-$1,146-32%
Maine$2,387-$1,207-34%
Delaware$2,350-$1,244-35%
New Hampshire$2,342-$1,252-35%
Washington D.C.$2,318-$1,276-36%
Massachusetts$2,315-$1,279-36%
New Jersey$2,276-$1,318-37%
California$2,138-$1,456-41%
Vermont$1,962-$1,632-45%
Hawaii$918-$2,676-74%

How much is homeowners insurance on average?

The average yearly cost of homeowners insurance is $2,777 for a dwelling and liability coverage of $300,000, with a $1,000 deductible, based on 2022 rates.

The nationwide average annual cost for home insurance for a variety of coverage levels are shown below.

Average home insurance rates by coverage level
Average Annual Premium Dwelling coverage Deductible Liability coverage
$2,218$200,000$1,000$100,000
$2,233$200,000$1,000$300,000
$2,762$300,000$1,000$100,000
$2,777$300,000$1,000$300,000
$3,215$400,000$1,000$100,000
$3,231$400,000$1,000$300,000
$3,580$500,000$1,000$100,000
$3,594$500,000$1,000$300,000
$3,823$600,000$1,000$100,000
$3,839$600,000$1,000$300,000

What to consider when buying home insurance

When buying a homeowners insurance policy, you decide the coverage amount for the following:

  • Dwelling
  • Liability
  • Medical payments

The limits of your coverage for the following are typically a set percentage of your dwelling coverage limit as shown below:

  • Other structures – 10%
  • Personal property – 50%
  • Loss of use – 20%

You also choose a home insurance deductible amount, which applies to claims for damage to your home or belongings. Deductibles usually come in the amounts of $500, $1,000, $1,500, $2,000 and $2,500. The higher your deductible, the lower your rate.

You should buy enough dwelling coverage to match the full replacement cost of your home. It's a good idea to get at least $300,000 of liability coverage to ensure sufficient coverage.

Learning how to calculate your home replacement cost or value is important because the amount helps you determine how much dwelling coverage to buy.

Medical payments coverage pays for injuries to guests in your home, regardless of who is at fault. Medical payments differs from liability insurance in significant ways, primarily in that it is for minor incidents and comes in very low limits of $1,000 or $5,000. The latter amount of $5,000 is recommended.

How to find the best home insurance companies

When shopping for home insurance, you want to do more than just compare average homeowners insurance rates. After all, the true test of an insurer is customer service and how claims are handled.

Insurance.com’s annual best home insurance companies ranking lists the top national insurers. Here are the top-rated home insurance companies for 2022, based on Insurance.com’s analysis of average rates, J.D. Power and A.M. best ratings, and discounts available.

Best home insurance companies
Company Rating (out of 5)
USAA4.8
State Farm4.5
Auto-Owners4.3
AIG4.1
Progressive4.1
Allstate4
Nationwide4
Erie3.9
American Family3.8
Chubb3.8
Travelers3.7
Famers3.2

Factors that affect homeowners insurance cost

Many factors affect home insurance rates. They include

  • Age. Older homes have older wiring and plumbing so they are a bigger risk of causing a fire or flooding a basement.
  • Building materials. How your home is constructed affects insurance rates.
  • Deductible. A higher deductible means lower rates.
  • Claims history. The claims history includes both claims you filed and ones that previous owners filed.
  • Credit history. Nearly all states allow insurers to consider a person's credit history.

Another thing that can affect rates is homeowners insurance discounts. Insurance companies offer dozens of discounts. Some of the largest discounts include those for having a new home, bundling your home insurance with your auto insurance, and upgrading your wiring, plumbing, and heating.

How does location affect homeowners insurance?

Location is one of the biggest factors in your home insurance rates.

Insurers consider many factors when judging location:

  • Weather (areas that experience more natural disasters will likely have higher premiums)
  • Population density
  • Nearness to an area that could lead to claims, such as woods (fire risk) or dangerous roads or intersections (cars crashing into your living room)
  • Proximity to a fire department and fire hydrant
  • Claims history for the area

Home insurance companies base rates in part by location, which can go well beyond the state level, says Burl Daniel, CPCU, CIC, CRM, Property and Casualty Insurance Expert Witness, in Fort Worth, Texas.

Daniel said that generally speaking, insurers base rates and premiums on a home's COPE:

  • Construction (brick/frame)
  • Occupancy (owner/tenant)
  • Protection (fire department rating)
  • Exposure (residential vs. commercial neighborhood)

One part of a state might have higher rates because there is more crime. Or another part of the state may have lower rates because severe weather losses are less frequent.

"It's not one size fits all," Daniel says.

Living near a full-time fire station with a nearby hydrant plays a role in your home insurance rates. The reason an insurer wants a home near a fire department and hydrant is that there is less chance of your home burning down if you live near a fire station. Having a hydrant nearby also means that firefighters can start battling a house fire faster than if the hydrant is down the street -- or even miles away.

Frequently asked questions

How can I get cheaper homeowners insurance?

The easiest way to get cheaper home insurance is to shop around. You can also consider raising your deductible and looking for discounts.

Can I lower my coverage to decrease my premium?

A homeowner can lower the coverage to decrease their premium, but this is not recommended. You’ll need to maintain the amount of coverage required by your mortgage company, and being underinsured is risky.

Can I make changes to my home that will lower my insurance cost?

You can lower your rates by adding storm shutters, updating your roof, and other risk-mitigating changes. You should also consider streamlining the heating system, electrical system, and plumbing in order to lower the possibility of fire and water damage.

How much is home insurance in Texas?

Based on Insurance.com’s rate analysis, on average the home insurance cost in Texas is $4,142. Texas is counted among the states with the highest homeowners insurance rates.

How much is homeowners insurance in California?

The average cost of home insurance in California is $1,380. It is one of the five states with the least expensive homeowners insurance.

How much should I pay for home insurance?

The amount you pay for homeowners insurance is determined by many factors. And the cost varies depending on the individual, but it typically requires enough dwelling coverage to rebuild one's home and enough personal property protection for their belongings.

Methodology:

Insurance.com in 2022 commissioned Quadrant Information Systems to field home insurance rates from major insurers in each state for nearly all ZIP codes in the country for 10 coverage levels based on various dwelling and deductible limits. The homeowner profile is a 35-year-old married applicant with an excellent insurance score insuring a new business HO-3 policy for a house built in 2000 with frame construction and composition roof. Other Structures: 10%. Loss of Use defaulted: 10%. Personal Property defaulted: 50%. Guest Medical limit: $5,000. Personal property: 50% of dwelling coverage for actual cash value. Content was updated for 2023.

*Some state rates will vary based on the addition of a hurricane deductible and may be much higher when included.