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Average homeowners insurance rates by state

By Posted : March 27, 2018

Whether you own a home already or you’re house-hunting, it’s wise to know average home insurance rates for your state so you can anticipate what your expense is when shopping your policy and creating a family budget. Knowing what you can expect to pay also helps you save money when comparing rates because you can more easily flag rates that are above the average home insurance cost for your area.

Let Insurance.com help you find affordable home insurance now.

Average home insurance cost by state

While many factors go into calculating your rate, where you live is chief among them. Homeowners in states that are prone to hurricanes, hail storms, tornados and earthquakes tend to pay the most for home insurance. Insurance.com’s analysis of rates from top insurers for nearly every ZIP code in the country bears this out. Florida and Louisiana are the most expensive states for home insurance among six common coverage levels analyzed by Insurance.com. The least expensive states for home insurance are Hawaii and Vermont

As you’ll see in the homeowners insurance cost by state chart below, Florida is the most expensive state for home insurance, nearly $2,350 more than the national average for the coverage level analyzed. We show average home rates for five other common coverage levels at the end of this article.

Homeowners insurance: Average cost by state

$200,000 dwelling with $1,000 deductible and $100,000 liability

State

Average annual rate% difference from national average rate $1,228$ difference from national average rate $1,288
Florida$3,575191%$2,347
Louisiana$2,979143%$1,751
Oklahoma$2,651116%$1,422
Alabama$2,31488%$1,086
Mississippi$2,29086%$1,062
Arkansas$2,06368%$835
Texas$1,94558%$716
Kansas$1,93958%$711
Missouri$1,72240%$494
Nebraska$1,58329%$355
Tennessee$1,52124%$293
Colorado$1,41715%$188
South Carolina$1,40214%$174
South Dakota$1,37912%$150
Kentucky$1,35510%$126
North Dakota$1,35410%$126
Minnesota$1,3339%$104
West Virginia$1,2885%$60
Rhode Island$1,205-2%-$23
Iowa$1,205-2%-$23
Indiana$1,198-2%-$30
New Mexico$1,197-3%-$31
Massachusetts$1,190-3%-$38
Montana$1,175-4%-$54
Georgia$1,103-10%-$125
Michigan$1,073-13%-$155
Illinois$1,053-14%-$175
Wyoming$976-21%-$252
Virginia$959-22%-$269
New York$935-24%-$293
Alaska$908-26%-$321
Connecticut$902-27%-$326
Maryland$866-30%-$363
Ohio$864-30%-$364
Arizona$813-34%-$415
Pennsylvania$801-35%-$427
California$793-35%-$435
Wisconsin$788-36%-$441
North Carolina$773-37%-$456
Delaware$748-39%-$480
Maine$721-41%-$507
New Jersey$711-42%-$517
DC$706-42%-$522
Nevada$703-43%-$525
New Hampshire$680-45%-$548
Washington$653-47%-$575
Oregon$643-48%-$585
Utah$642-48%-$586
Idaho$622-49%-$606
Vermont$589-52%-$640
Hawaii$337-73%-$891

Insurers review many factors when calculating your home insurance rate. Some of these variables are beyond your control, but you do have some influence over how much you pay for home insurance. By pricing other insurers every few years at least, choosing a higher deductible, making sure you get all the discounts that you can and not filing too many claims, you can do your part to get the lowest insurance rates possible for your home. We'll explain these topics in detail:

How much is homeowners insurance?

When buying a homeowner insurance policy, you decide the coverage amount for the following:

  • dwelling
  • liability
  • medical payments

The limits of your coverage for the following are typically a set percentage of your dwelling coverage limit as shown below:

  • other structures – 10 percent
  • personal property – 50 percent
  • loss of use – 20 percent

You also choose a home insurance deductible amount, which applies to claims for damage to your home or belongings, but not if you’re sued or a medical claim is filed by someone injured in your home. Deductibles usually come in the amounts of $500, $1,000, $1,500, $2,000 and $2,500. The higher your deductible, the lower your rate.

You should buy enough dwelling coverage to match the full replacement cost of your home, and it is recommended to have $300,000 of liability coverage to ensure sufficient coverage. 

Learning how to calculate your home replacement cost or value is important, because the amount helps you determine how much dwelling coverage to buy. Figuring out an accurate replacment cost can be done by using online tools, calculating it yourself or by hiring an appraiser.

Medical payments coverage pays for injuries to guests in your home, regardless of who is at fault. Medical payments differs from liability insurance in significant ways, primarily in that it is for minor incidents and comes in very low limits of $1,000 or $5,000. The latter amount of $5,000 is recommended.

The nationwide average annual cost for home insurance for common coverage levels, based on a rate analysis by Insurance.com:

  • $1,228: $200,000 dwelling with $1,000 deductible and $100,000 liability coverage
  • $1,244: $200,000 dwelling with $1,000 deductible and $300,000 liability coverage
  • $1,737: $300,000 dwelling with $1,000 deductible and $300,000 liability coverage
  • $2,252: $400,000 dwelling with $1,000 deductible and $300,000 liability coverage
  • $2,790: $500,000 dwelling with $1,000 deductible and $300,000 liability coverage
  • $3,295: $600,000 dwelling with $1,000 deductible and $300,000 liability coverage

Review customer satisfaction to find the best home insurance companies

When shopping for home insurance, you want to do more than just compare average homeowners insurance rates. After all, how you’re treated when you file a claim is priceless. 

Insure.com’s annual Best Home Insurance Companies ranking also lists top insurers. Here are the top 10, based on a survey of 3,700 customers, asking them about customer service, claims processing, value for price and if they would recommend the company and would renew their policy:

  1. USAA
  2. Chubb
  3. Allstate
  4. AIG
  5. Esurance
  6. Progressive
  7. Liberty Mutual
  8. American Family
  9. Hartford
  10. Erie

 

Factors that shape home insurance rates – in detail

Home insurance companies analyze potential risk when devising home insurance rates.

Many factors affect home insurance rates. Here's a look at what impacts home insurance rates:

  • Your home's age -- Older homes have older wiring and plumbing so they are a bigger risk of causing a fire or flooding a basement.
  • Your home's building materials -- Insurers consider a wood-framed home a greater risk than a home made of brick. Fire, wind and pests can cause more damage to a wooden home compared to a brick structure.
  • Your home insurance deductible -- Insurance companies like higher deductibles because it means you're less apt to file a claim and will pay more for repairs if you file a claim.
  • Your homeowners insurance discounts -- Insurance companies offer dozens of discounts. Three of the largest discounts are bundling your home with other types of insurance, such as auto; loyalty, which is staying with an insurance company for at least a few years; and being claims free for a period of time. Note: Insurers usually have a cap on the percentage of discounts you can receive. The limit is often set at 25 percent.
  • Your home's claims history -- The claims history includes both your filed claims and ones that previous owners filed. If you file more than one claim in a 10-year period, you can expect your insurance rates to increase. They'll increase even more if you file more home claims. That could even cause your insurance company to drop you because you're considered too much of a risk.
  • Credit history -- Nearly all states allow insurers to consider a person's credit history when devising a home insurance premium. Insurance companies say that credit history is a good indication as to whether a person will file claims.

 

Once an insurer compiles that information, it is able to create a home insurance rate. An insurance company first looks at the home's perceived risk, the home's location and the homeowner. An insurer then reviews filed claims and adds surcharges to the rate. They lastly subtract applicable discounts. The result is your home insurance premium.

 

Location plays an important role in the cost of home insurance

Location is one of the biggest factors in your home insurance rates.

Insurers consider many factors when judging location:

  • Weather (areas that experience more natural disasters will likely have higher premiums)
  • Population density
  • Nearness to an area that could lead to claims, such as woods (fire risk) or dangerous roads or intersections (cars crashing into your living room)
  • Proximity to a fire department and fire hydrant
  • Claims history for the area

 

Home insurance companies base rates in part by location, which can go well beyond the state level, said Burl Daniel, CPCU, CIC, CRM, Property and Casualty Insurance Expert Witness, in Fort Worth, Texas.

Daniel said that generally speaking, insurers base rates and premiums on a home's COPE:

  • Construction (brick/frame)
  • Occupancy (owner/tenant)
  • Protection (fire department rating)
  • Exposure (residential vs. commercial neighborhood)

 

One part of a state might have higher rates because there is more crime. Or another part of the state may have lower rates because severe weather losses are less frequent.

For instance, someone who lives in New England near the ocean might not get as much snow as someone 25 miles inland. So, the person along the coast with less snowfall may pay less due to a lower risk of freeze losses. Or, on the other hand, if that person lives right along the coastline, he may pay more because of increased risk of ocean windstorm-related damage.

"It's not one size fits all," said Daniel.

Living near a full-time fire station with a nearby hydrant plays a role in your home insurance rates. The reason an insurer wants a home near a fire department and hydrant is that there is less chance of your home burning down if you live near a fire station. Having a hydrant nearby also means that firefighters can start battling a house fire faster than if the hydrant is down the street -- or even miles away.

 

Weather-related claims

If you live in the part of the country with brutal, frigid winters, you will likely pay more for your insurance. Not only because rough winters can cause damage from snow and ice, but also frigid temperatures can cause frozen pipes and flooded basements.

Insurance Information Institute said that water damage and freezing caused nearly 34 percent of all losses in 2014.

Areas prone to wildfires can also have higher rates. Major wildfires aren't just contained to areas that don't get much rain like Southern California. Wildfires have destroyed thousands of acres in the Pacific Northwest and Tennessee in recent years. Those areas will likely see their home insurance rates increase.

Weather-related claims are often the most frequent, according to III. Here are the top five most frequent claims:

  • Wind and hail
  • Water damage and freezing
  • Vandalism and malicious mischief
  • Theft
  • Fire, lightning and debris removal

 

Water damage and freezing are the highest total dollar amount for claims. The most expensive homeowners insurance claims by incident are:

  • Fire, lightning and debris removal
  • Bodily injury and property damage
  • Wind and hail
  • Water damage and freezing
  • Vandalism and malicious mischief

 

III said about one in 15 insured homes has a claim each year and about one in 30 insured homes has a property damage claim related to wind or hail each year.

One way to keep your insurance rates down is to not file claims. That might sound counter-productive. You have insurance so why shouldn't you take advantage of it, right? Wrong.

More claims mean higher insurance premiums and can cause your insurer to drop you.

Here's one way to make sure that you don't file too many claims -- raise your deductible. The deductible is what you have to pay for repairs after filing a claim. The insurance company picks up the rest of the repair costs. An added benefit -- raising your deductible will also decrease your home insurance premium.

If you decide to increase your deductible, make sure you set aside enough money to pay for the higher deductible in case you have to file a claim.

 

Risky areas to insure a home

Insurance companies review claims from an entire neighborhood when devising rates. Insurers gauge risk by looking at the number of burglaries, vandalism and weather-related claims in an area. Insurance companies usually use zip codes when gauging an area, but your neighborhood and even your street can influence your home insurance rates.

Daniel said insurers may deem a high-crime neighborhood or ones without a nearby full-time fire department and nearby fire hydrants as high risk.

When an insurer perceives higher risk of loss, it may only offer limited policies or policies with limited perils coverage and/or higher deductibles so there is less chance of claims due to increased risk of loss.

If it's bad enough, an insurer can say the risks are too high and may not write a homeowners insurance policy, said Daniel.

Average homeowners insurance rates by state for five common coverage levels 

$200,000 dwelling with $1,000 deductible and $300,000 liability

Annual average rate
StateNational Average: $1,244% difference$ difference
Florida$3,591189%$2,347
Louisiana$3,011142%$1,767
Oklahoma$2,666114%$1,421
Alabama$2,33187%$1,087
Mississippi$2,30585%$1,061
Arkansas$2,07867%$833
Texas$1,95557%$711
Kansas$1,94656%$702
Missouri$1,73740%$493
Nebraska$1,59328%$348
Tennessee$1,53023%$286
Colorado$1,42715%$183
South Carolina$1,41714%$172
South Dakota$1,39512%$151
Kentucky$1,37110%$127
North Dakota$1,36710%$123
Minnesota$1,3468%$102
West Virginia$1,3085%$63
Rhode Island$1,222-2%-$22
Iowa$1,218-2%-$26
New Mexico$1,214-2%-$31
Massachusetts$1,211-3%-$33
Indiana$1,208-3%-$36
Montana$1,193-4%-$51
Georgia$1,114-10%-$130
Michigan$1,089-12%-$155
Illinois$1,063-15%-$181
Wyoming$994-20%-$250
Virginia$972-22%-$272
New York$956-23%-$288
Alaska$926-26%-$318
Connecticut$925-26%-$320
Maryland$878-29%-$366
Ohio$878-29%-$367
Arizona$826-34%-$418
California$822-34%-$422
Pennsylvania$817-34%-$427
Wisconsin$800-36%-$444
North Carolina$780-37%-$464
Delaware$760-39%-$484
New Jersey$737-41%-$508
Maine$735-41%-$509
Nevada$723-42%-$521
DC$721-42%-$523
New Hampshire$698-44%-$546
Washington$669-46%-$575
Utah$664-47%-$580
Oregon$658-47%-$587
Idaho$642-48%-$602
Vermont$606-51%-$638
Hawaii$357-71%-$887

$300,000 dwelling with $1,000 deductible and $300,000 liability

Annual average rate
StateNational Average: $1,727% difference$ difference
Florida$5,207200%$3,471
Louisiana$4,474158%$2,737
Oklahoma$3,599107%$1,862
Alabama$3,38395%$1,646
Mississippi$3,31691%$1,580
Arkansas$3,04075%$1,303
Kansas$2,60650%$870
Texas$2,59950%$862
Missouri$2,39238%$655
Tennessee$2,14223%$406
Nebraska$2,12322%$386
South Carolina$2,11021%$373
South Dakota$1,94612%$209
Rhode Island$1,94212%$206
Colorado$1,90410%$167
Kentucky$1,8849%$148
West Virginia$1,8778%$141
North Dakota$1,8507%$114
Minnesota$1,7762%$39
Iowa$1,661-4%-$76
Indiana$1,630-6%-$106
New Mexico$1,630-6%-$107
Georgia$1,601-8%-$135
Massachusetts$1,599-8%-$138
Montana$1,594-8%-$143
Michigan$1,533-12%-$203
New York$1,429-18%-$307
Wyoming$1,412-19%-$325
Illinois$1,406-19%-$330
Virginia$1,389-20%-$347
Connecticut$1,323-24%-$414
Alaska$1,256-28%-$481
Maryland$1,231-29%-$506
California$1,200-31%-$536
Ohio$1,186-32%-$551
Pennsylvania$1,184-32%-$553
North Carolina$1,174-32%-$563
Wisconsin$1,110-36%-$627
Arizona$1,081-38%-$656
DC$1,017-41%-$720
New Jersey$1,012-42%-$725
Delaware$1,003-42%-$733
Maine$989-43%-$748
Nevada$957-45%-$780
New Hampshire$939-46%-$798
Washington$896-48%-$840
Oregon$892-49%-$845
Utah$879-49%-$858
Idaho$856-51%-$881
Vermont$816-53%-$920
Hawaii$510-71%-$1,226

$400,000 dwelling with $1,000 deductible and $300,000 liability

Annual average rate
StateNational Average: $2,252% difference$ difference
Florida$6,910207%$4,658
Louisiana$6,097171%$3,845
Alabama$4,540102%$2,288
Oklahoma$4,47999%$2,227
Mississippi$4,32692%$2,074
Arkansas$4,01678%$1,764
Texas$3,27545%$1,023
Kansas$3,22743%$975
Missouri$3,11338%$861
South Carolina$2,79724%$545
Tennessee$2,76223%$510
Rhode Island$2,69720%$445
Nebraska$2,63417%$382
South Dakota$2,51212%$260
West Virginia$2,47210%$220
Kentucky$2,4378%$185
Colorado$2,3474%$95
North Dakota$2,3354%$83
Minnesota$2,2460%-$6
Georgia$2,168-4%-$84
Indiana$2,081-8%-$171
Iowa$2,071-8%-$181
New Mexico$2,028-10%-$224
Massachusetts$2,023-10%-$229
Montana$1,990-12%-$262
Michigan$1,986-12%-$266
New York$1,957-13%-$295
Wyoming$1,898-16%-$354
Virginia$1,845-18%-$407
Connecticut$1,784-21%-$468
Illinois$1,753-22%-$499
Maryland$1,661-26%-$591
Alaska$1,627-28%-$625
California$1,605-29%-$647
Pennsylvania$1,573-30%-$679
Ohio$1,519-33%-$733
North Carolina$1,482-34%-$770
Wisconsin$1,405-38%-$847
Arizona$1,346-40%-$907
DC$1,337-41%-$915
New Jersey$1,298-42%-$954
Delaware$1,265-44%-$987
Maine$1,262-44%-$990
New Hampshire$1,230-45%-$1,022
Nevada$1,201-47%-$1,051
Washington$1,147-49%-$1,105
Oregon$1,133-50%-$1,119
Idaho$1,104-51%-$1,148
Utah$1,100-51%-$1,152
Vermont$1,033-54%-$1,219
Hawaii$694-69%-$1,558

$500,000 dwelling with $1,000 deductible and $300,000 liability

Annual average rate
StateNational Average: $2,790% difference$ difference
Florida$8,552207%$5,762
Louisiana$7,705176%$4,915
Alabama$5,639102%$2,849
Mississippi$5,39093%$2,600
Oklahoma$5,37193%$2,581
Arkansas$5,04781%$2,257
Texas$3,99243%$1,202
Missouri$3,84238%$1,052
Kansas$3,79536%$1,005
South Carolina$3,55227%$762
Tennessee$3,50826%$718
Rhode Island$3,47825%$688
South Dakota$3,16013%$370
Nebraska$3,15813%$368
West Virginia$3,09411%$304
Kentucky$3,0529%$262
North Dakota$2,8061%$16
Georgia$2,7980%$8
Colorado$2,760-1%-$30
Minnesota$2,728-2%-$62
Indiana$2,545-9%-$245
New York$2,517-10%-$273
Iowa$2,495-11%-$295
Massachusetts$2,485-11%-$305
Michigan$2,473-11%-$317
New Mexico$2,425-13%-$365
Montana$2,424-13%-$366
Wyoming$2,364-15%-$426
Virginia$2,343-16%-$447
Connecticut$2,231-20%-$560
Illinois$2,162-22%-$628
Maryland$2,121-24%-$669
California$2,020-28%-$770
Alaska$2,006-28%-$784
Pennsylvania$1,986-29%-$804
North Carolina$1,903-32%-$887
Ohio$1,881-33%-$909
Wisconsin$1,759-37%-$1,031
DC$1,699-39%-$1,091
Arizona$1,636-41%-$1,154
New Jersey$1,610-42%-$1,180
Delaware$1,604-42%-$1,186
Maine$1,560-44%-$1,230
New Hampshire$1,535-45%-$1,255
Nevada$1,462-48%-$1,328
Washington$1,401-50%-$1,389
Oregon$1,383-50%-$1,407
Idaho$1,343-52%-$1,447
Utah$1,334-52%-$1,456
Vermont$1,255-55%-$1,535
Hawaii$880-68%-$1,910

$600,000 dwelling with $1,000 deductible and $300,000 liability

Annual average rate
StateNational Average: $3,295% difference$ difference
Florida$10,204210%$6,909
Louisiana$9,289182%$5,994
Alabama$6,765105%$3,470
Mississippi$6,41795%$3,122
Oklahoma$6,15387%$2,858
Arkansas$5,94780%$2,652
Texas$4,70843%$1,413
Missouri$4,51937%$1,224
South Carolina$4,28730%$992
Kansas$4,27530%$980
Rhode Island$4,24029%$945
Tennessee$4,15626%$861
West Virginia$3,71713%$422
South Dakota$3,71713%$422
Kentucky$3,60910%$314
Nebraska$3,5688%$273
Gerogia$3,3783%$83
North Dakota$3,208-3%-$87
Minnesota$3,164-4%-$131
Colorado$3,115-5%-$180
New York$3,082-6%-$213
Indiana$2,944-11%-$351
Massachussetts$2,932-11%-$363
Michigan$2,903-12%-$392
Iowa$2,870-13%-$425
Virginia$2,834-14%-$461
Montana$2,793-15%-$502
Wyoming$2,773-16%-$522
New Mexico$2,761-16%-$534
Connecticut$2,682-19%-$613
Maryland$2,565-22%-$730
Illinois$2,546-23%-$749
California$2,448-26%-$847
Alaska$2,398-27%-$897
Pennsylvania$2,376-28%-$919
North Carolina$2,351-29%-$944
Ohio$2,220-33%-$1,075
Wisconsin$2,119-36%-$1,176
DC$2,050-38%-$1,245
New Jersey$1,931-41%-$1,364
Delaware$1,896-42%-$1,399
Arizona$1,867-43%-$1,428
Maine$1,835-44%-$1,460
New Hampshire$1,814-45%-$1,481
Nevada$1,677-49%-$1,618
Washington$1,660-50%-$1,635
Oregon$1,621-51%-$1,674
Idaho$1,583-52%-$1,712
Utah$1,549-53%-$1,746
Vermont$1,456-56%-$1,839
Hawaii$1,076-67%-$2,219

Methodology:

Insurance.com in 2016 commissioned Quadrant Information Systems to field home insurance rates from major insurers in each state for nearly all ZIP codes in the country for 75 coverage levels based on various dwelling and deductible limits. The homeowner profile is a 35-year-old married applicant with excellent insurance score; new business HO3 policy for house built in 2000 with frame construction and composition roof. Other Structures: 10%. Loss of Use defaulted: 10%. Personal Property defaulted: 50%. Guest Medical limit: $5,000. Personal property: 50% of dwelling coverage for actual cash value.

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